Year: 2019

TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day: Bill Evans & Jim Hall – Skating In Central Park

This entry was originally posted on TheLarchWood “Skating In Central Park” was originally written by John Lewis for “Odds Against Tomorrow”, a 1959’s film produced and directed by Robert Wise. The Modern Jazz Quartet recorded the tune for the film and for their album Music from Odds Against Tomorrow and released it in 1959 on United Artists Record. Bill Evans and Jim Hall re-record the waltz and released it on their 1962 album Undercurrent on United Artists, which Jazz critic Pete Welding stated: “This collaboration between Evans and Hall has resulted in some of the most beautiful, thoroughly ingratiating music it has been my pleasure to hear—now or any other time. Each of the selections is suffused with a lyric charm, a tenderness, an elegance, an unabashed romanticism that take one’s breath away. These joint inventions have the stamp of inevitability about them, the ring of utter verity in every line and note—the result of a perfect meeting of minds.Yet not only is the music remarkable for its delicacy and subtlety of interaction, it is …

A Forsaken Coast

I had just finished packing for a trip I was planning. T’s, shorts, towel, brush, chargers, medicines and sunglasses. It was all done and felt good. I glanced over at the clock and it was little past midnight. I had to head out in just four hours. Sleeping was never an option when it had come to this place. The first ever article I posted on this blog was based upon some of the very firsts experiences I had had by traveling to this beach, Bakkhali. At that moment, I knew whatever I had gotten in my head for the place was going to be looking good on paper. So much so that when I re-read it now, the primordial emotions toward the place feel reincarnated once again. Ebb tides, diseased sea, heavy breeze, grey beach, red meadows, promiscuous shrubs, miles of salt ceders scattered about some mediocre woods, high tides, and home to hundreds of wildlife including us, the humans, guarded by the lady as well as the guardian spirit of the forests, Dhamra …

A Young Director and his only film

I came across a brief write up by one of my acquaintances on Facebook   a few days back. “…Asia is the place where cinema is still breathing a fresh whiff of significant cinema – something which current European cinema is visibly lacking!”, it concluded. He listed a bunch of directors from different parts of Asia who are shining with their works today. But what caught my eyes was this line: “Sadly, I couldn’t add Bo Hu’s name.” I asked him if it’s because of the fact Hu Bo is no more. His answer was ‘yes’. ‘An elephant sitting still” is the first and the last feature film by Chinese director Hu Bo. He killed himself during the final editing procedure of the film, in 2017, at the age of 29. The film came out in 2018 and immediately gained attention from world audience. Hu Bo was a student of Bela Tarr, the Hungarian auteur. The film opens up in a morning with a story about an elephant, narrated in a voice of one of the …

The amazing works of Julia Margaret Cameron

In 1863, right after her 48th birthday, Julia Margaret Cameron received her first camera as a gift from her daughter and son-in-law with the words, “It may amuse you, Mother, to try to photograph during your solitude at Freshwater.” The gift came at a moment to Cameron when her husband was investigating his family’s failed coffee crop in Caylon, Sri Lanka, when all their sons were grown and their only daughter had married and moved away. Within a year, the mother of six, a deeply religious and well read Cameron became a member of the Photographic Societies of London and Scotland and the camera became far more than an amusement to her: “From the first moment I handled my lens with a tender ardour,” she wrote, “and it has become to me as a living thing, with voice and memory and creative vigour.” In her photography, Cameron strove to capture beauty. She wrote, “I longed to arrest all the beauty that came before me and at length the longing has been satisfied.” Favoring lenses that …

Maborosi and memory

Maborosi, the first feature film by contemporary Japanese maestro Kore-eda Hirokazu. Yumiko, the protagonist, is a girl when we first meet her. She lives with her parents and grandmother in Osaka. Her grandmother leaves the home to go back to the village she is from before dying. Yumiko tries to stop her but fails. Her grandmother never comes back. She met a boy with a bicycle named Iuko and the story cuts forward to several years when they are married and have a new-born child. Their life is happy and charming until Yumiko becomes a widow. After five years or so a well-wisher of Yumiko finds a match for her named Tamio who lives with his daughter and his father in a village by the sea far away from Osaka. Yumiko moves there with her son to start a new life. I sat still in my chair even after the end credits were gone and the faint hint of light was clearing out the darkness of the screen. I was in my room and it …

Listen to these Sounds of Mother Earth

On a recent trip to an ‘isolated mountain’, I happened to realize how insignificant we are in this vastness of space. Traveling at the speed of light, it would take almost 100,000 years to cross the Milky Way. So if you imagine a particle of dust upon this gargantuan planet, you are still nowhere near to perceive how infinitesimally small a position we occupy in this universe. Yet, here on Earth, not everyone of us are reinforced when we think about our place in this space. Some of us even dip ourselves in the faith that Earth is flat and everything else around us is revolved around this celestial being to cope with this implausible vastness. But in the grand scheme of things, the truth is, we are just too small. Reflecting on this vastness and our insignificance within this universe often leads to a philosophical question and that is: Should one feel dreary for being too small? Because this idea of banality gives an immense spur to nihilism, that’s for sure. For all we …

From Revenge to a Reconciliation Factory

When you’re an adult, one of the many things you miss the most is probably the ingenuousness of your childhood and the simplicity it once bestowed upon your forsaken infancy. Gone are the simple and colorful splashes of a livelihood that once made you happy. But you’ve always gotta move forward; well, that’s the only option!! And with coming-to-age technologies and social media it’s getting even harder everyday to keep up with the simplicity that you once experienced. We just can’t seem to hold on to and get enough of them. And it’s not just about an intricate lifestyle but everything aesthetic we are revolved around with. From a piece of art to a fragment of music, we tend to seek the steepest ravine to appreciate the art and the artist. Walking into the auditorium on Anya Theater’s Revenge Factory, directed by Debashish, there’s an instant feeling of proximity conveyed upon the audiences as soon as the curtain unravels. A utility pole entangled with wires with an almost fuzzy yellow light hanging from it. Just …

Le Mariage Collectif – A Soundtrack Worth Remembering

If you type in Le Mariage Collectif or simply Collective Marriage on Google, it’s definitely unlike most of the search results you would get for a movie. There’s not much out there on internet about it that might be of your interest. Mariage Collectif has been anything but remembered by history as an important movie, that’s for sure, a fact even admitted by the press release for its soundtrack. A 1971’s French drama based upon a married couple having difficulties in sexual relationship. Sounds lame, right? Well, not everything about this movie is as lame as you think it might be. Conversely, Mariage Collectif could be taken as a minor classic as well. But what has really been noteworthy and significant about it is the soundtrack from Jean-Pierre Mirouze and the story behind the recovery of the album. Even though, Mariage Collectif’s soundtrack is considered one of the most fascinating album out there and has influenced many sounds of 21st century, the album was once long forgotten and had been conserved through only a handful …

Of Swan Lake

Back when I was a kid, another fascinating thing about an animated series was the music. The weekends were full of joints from Justice League, Spider-Man: The New Animated Series, Gargoyles, Cédric, Oswald, Bob the Builder, Noddy, Looney Tunes and many others that I probably don’t even remember the name of. Back when there was not really a thing called internet to take over the control of your attention span. No annoying notifications from your IG or Twitter to ponder upon. So everything you would do, especially, aesthetically, you would do in absolute wonder. You know the Richard David James’ quote, “The holy grail for a music fan is to hear music from another planet, which has not been influenced by us whatsoever. Or, even better, from lots of different planets. The closest we got to that was before the Internet, when people didn’t know of each other’s existence. Now, that doesn’t really happen.” There was a minimal beauty in grasping an album by heart. The one album that you’d know every word of or …

TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day: Eric Church – Springsteen

I remember listening to Springsteen for the first time on some online radio back in 2012. It was sublime. Reminded me of my high school romance that I had thought I would not be able to live without. But there I was….taking a long walk off a short pier. Springsteen was released as a single off Eric Church’s third studio album Chief on February 21, 2012. The song was written by Church, Jeff Hyde and Ryan Tyndell and was inspired by a memory of a girl and tells the story of a teenage romance. Even though the song carries enough glimmer to feel like Spring, the title is originally centered around Church’s idol: Bruce Springsteen. Springsteen is TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day getting 5 conifer cones out of 5 for the day. Listen Below.

TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day: Kacey Musgraves – Lonely Weekend

Almost a year ago on March 30th, 2018 Kacey Musgraves released her fourth studio album Golden Hour through MCA Nashville. Kacey co-wrote and co-produced all the 13 tracks in the album with Daniel Tashian and Ian Fitchuk. And there’s no better time to listen to it than March itself. The 2nd track off Golden Hour: Lonely Weekend is TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day getting 5 conifer cones out of 5 for the day. Listen Below.

TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day: Poemme – Tadpoles

One distinctive feature of Poemme’s 2017’s album BLOOMING SPRING has to be its arbitrary emancipation. The album isn’t restricted to any emotional boundaries. It doesn’t deliver a sense of deep melancholy or morbidness, neither does it express an utmost bliss that goes beyond our cognition. Rather it gives out a feeling of a conventional and convivial life that we are fastened with. The 3rd track off Blooming Spring is TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day getting 5 conifer cones out of 5 for the day. Listen Below.

The Lion Hunt

Peter Paul Rubens was born in Siegen, Westphalia on June 28, 1577 and spent the first 10 years of his life in Cologne. In 1600, Rubens troubled to Italy. During time spent in the country, he immersed himself in Italy’s culture and way of life and adopted an Italian technical innovation: oil sketch. Lion Hunt (74 x 105.5cm) (c.1615) is one of Rubens’ earliest known hunting paintings painted on a wooden panel. The monochromatic masterpiece alludes the aristocratic patronage and privileged status of its time. There is no known finished painting that is entirely based on the sketch but several of its motifs appear in other works of Rubens. The dynamic composition of Lion Hunt captures the acute tension, energy, violence and the sap of Rubens’ style and the unparalleled eloquence of his hands. Even though Lion Hunt is an incomplete piece of art, it’s perfect in its own incompleteness. Featured Painting: Peter Paul Rubens – A Lion Hunt (c.1615)