First Person, Naps

Listen to these Sounds of Mother Earth

On a recent trip to an ‘isolated mountain’, I happened to realize how insignificant we are in this vastness of space. Traveling at the speed of light, it would take almost 100,000 years to cross the Milky Way. So if you imagine a particle of dust upon this gargantuan planet, you are still nowhere near to perceive how infinitesimally small a position we occupy in this universe. Yet, here on Earth, not everyone of us are reinforced when we think about our place in this space. Some of us even dip ourselves in the faith that Earth is flat and everything else around us is revolved around this celestial being to cope with this implausible vastness. But in the grand scheme of things, the truth is, we are just too small.

Reflecting on this vastness and our insignificance within this universe often leads to a philosophical question and that is: Should one feel dreary for being too small? Because this idea of banality gives an immense spur to nihilism, that’s for sure. For all we know, it’s entirely possible that our existence might get wiped out in the blink of an eye tomorrow while this universe might continue to exist, maybe forever, and our time on this fleck of earth will amount to nothing.

Standing at the edge of a mountain at 3:30 a.m. in the morning with an orange sky on one hand and a full moon on the other, the objectivity of beauty becomes quite discernible in the vastness of maximal mountains and trees. It shows how the propagation of elegance is nothing but pathetically trivial yet flamboyant and insincere. It’s a feeling of being trapped inside a cage while there is a lot more yet to discover and see. And by that, I mean the rest of the universe out there.

Yet here we are on Earth, in the lap of mother nature, who’s nurturing us at every moment of our lives and giving out every resources she has. It’s impossible to not appreciate what we are already given. It’s impossible to not appreciate Mother Earth.

Advertisements

6 Comments

    • What worries me the most is whether this question will ever find a valid answer and most importantly, do we have any purpose at all! Thanks so much for reading.

      Liked by 2 people

Comments are closed.