All posts filed under: Editor’s Choice

The amazing works of Julia Margaret Cameron

In 1863, right after her 48th birthday, Julia Margaret Cameron received her first camera as a gift from her daughter and son-in-law with the words, “It may amuse you, Mother, to try to photograph during your solitude at Freshwater.” The gift came at a moment to Cameron when her husband was investigating his family’s failed coffee crop in Caylon, Sri Lanka, when all their sons were grown and their only daughter had married and moved away. Within a year, the mother of six, a deeply religious and well read Cameron became a member of the Photographic Societies of London and Scotland and the camera became far more than an amusement to her: “From the first moment I handled my lens with a tender ardour,” she wrote, “and it has become to me as a living thing, with voice and memory and creative vigour.” In her photography, Cameron strove to capture beauty. She wrote, “I longed to arrest all the beauty that came before me and at length the longing has been satisfied.” Favoring lenses that …

Maborosi and memory

Maborosi, the first feature film by contemporary Japanese maestro Kore-eda Hirokazu. Yumiko, the protagonist, is a girl when we first meet her. She lives with her parents and grandmother in Osaka. Her grandmother leaves the home to go back to the village she is from before dying. Yumiko tries to stop her but fails. Her grandmother never comes back. She met a boy with a bicycle named Iuko and the story cuts forward to several years when they are married and have a new-born child. Their life is happy and charming until Yumiko becomes a widow. After five years or so a well-wisher of Yumiko finds a match for her named Tamio who lives with his daughter and his father in a village by the sea far away from Osaka. Yumiko moves there with her son to start a new life. I sat still in my chair even after the end credits were gone and the faint hint of light was clearing out the darkness of the screen. I was in my room and it …

Le Mariage Collectif – A Soundtrack Worth Remembering

If you type in Le Mariage Collectif or simply Collective Marriage on Google, it’s definitely unlike most of the search results you would get for a movie. There’s not much out there on internet about it that might be of your interest. Mariage Collectif has been anything but remembered by history as an important movie, that’s for sure, a fact even admitted by the press release for its soundtrack. A 1971’s French drama based upon a married couple having difficulties in sexual relationship. Sounds lame, right? Well, not everything about this movie is as lame as you think it might be. Conversely, Mariage Collectif could be taken as a minor classic as well. But what has really been noteworthy and significant about it is the soundtrack from Jean-Pierre Mirouze and the story behind the recovery of the album. Even though, Mariage Collectif’s soundtrack is considered one of the most fascinating album out there and has influenced many sounds of 21st century, the album was once long forgotten and had been conserved through only a handful …

The Supper At Emmaus

The term tenebrism, from the Italian word tenebroso (gloomy), is used to describe the overall tonality in a painting where there is a violent contrasts of light and darkness in figurative compositions in order to heighten the dramatic effect. Although Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio was not the inventor of tenebrism, the term is often associated with him because his tenebrists paintings were so influential. He executed The Supper At Emmaus in 1601 for Ciriaco Mattei, the Italian nobleman of Rome and of the House of Mattei and one of the most prolific art collectors of his time. The Supper At Emmaus depicts the moment when the resurrected Jesus reveals his identity to two of his disciples who had failed to recognize him in the town of Emmaus while an innkeeper stands over the group. The two of the disciples are presumed to be Luke and Cleopas. Caravaggio’s precise direction of light makes his figures stand out forcefully against their background and their presence is made more proximate by realistic detailing, such as the scallop shell …

Motherhood: Maman by Louise Bourgeois

Art, at its best, has been an expression of the human experience of life and the theme of mother and child has been a central motif in art for centuries. The Virgin Mary has presented the ideal of a protective mother to which women have aspired. But in the age of post-Freudian psychoanalysis, motherhood has become more eccentric and complex than ever. Louise Bourgeois was born on 25th December 1911 in Paris, France. She was the second child of three born to parents Joséphine Fauriaux and Louis Bourgeois. Taking up art was a way for her to fight specific fears. The fear and trauma of abandonment that she suffered not only through her untimely birth on Christmas Day but also on her mother’s death in 1932, when she was only twenty-one. Louise drew on painful memories of childhood traumas to create her tribute to her mother. In 1996, The Maman was created as a part of Bourgeois’s inaugural commission of The Unilever Series (2000), in the Turbine Hall at London’s Tate Modern. It’s a bronze, …

The Moonlight: John Atkinson Grimshaw

The “remarkable and imaginative painter” of Victorian Era who is best known for his somber moonlight upon urban landscapes and dockyards through leafless trees or cotton clouds expounded with pallid and augmented silhouettes, light and wet city streets. Born in Park Street, Leeds on 6 September 1836 to Mary and David Grimshaw, John Atkinson Grimshaw began his working life as a clerk for the Great Northern Railway. It was during the time as a clerk he begun to explore his love for painting. In 1861, at the age of 24, to the dismay of his parents, he abandoned his job to endorse all his time to become a painter. In 1862, only a year later after he had left his job, Grimshaw had his first exhibition under the patronage of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, which was mostly paintings of birds, fruit and blossom focused on still life and nature. By 1870, Grimashaw became successful enough to move to Knostrop Hall and rented another house in Scarborough, which he called ‘The Castle by the Sea’ …

False Memory

“A house made of hay and earth. There are small deities inside adorned with beads made of flower. They look old and pale and full of repudiations. A small ground out front that interconnects.. something..” Looking back at “it”, I don’t quite remember whether it is a dream or a memory. If it is a dream therefore I must have dreamed of it as a child and if it’s a memory, I’m quite certain it’s filled with glitches and false information. Most of us have the notion that our memory is solid and works in a way where we are only able to either remember things or forget things. Where as a matter of fact, our memory works in a quite intricate way. It can transform, change, reform and be unreliable at times. We can falsely remember a childhood event that never took place through effective suggestions. We can be tricked into changing a particular event that did took place or tricked into remembering events that never took place at all. While we might think …

Female Artists of the Victorian Era: Emma Sandys

Despite all the recent research, a very little is known of the life of Emma Sandys. A 19th century English Pre-Raphaelite artist and figure who sustained a successful career as an artist in the reign of Queen Victoria. It is believed that Emma was influenced by her brother Frederick Sandys, an associated artist of the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood, and his friend Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Emma Sandys was born in Norwich and had received her early lessens in drawing and painting from her father Anthony Sands who was a dyer and an artist himself. It was around 1853, the family put a “y” to their surname. The medievalism in Emma Sandys paintings clearly exhibits the Pre-Raphaelite influences upon them. Her works were mainly portraits in both oil and chalk and most of them are seen to be gazing thoughtfully out of the frame enclosed in their own world. Sandys works are engrossing but we know so little of her that many of her paintings were previously considered as the work of her brother. Only recent researches have …

A Brief History of Cubism

Cubism is an artistic movement started in early 20th century. The movement was principally pioneered by Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973) and Georges Braque (French, 1882–1963) in Paris between 1907 to 1914. The cubist painters rejected the conventional notion of copying the traditional perspective of the subject. They were not compelled to copy form, color, texture and space, instead they employed geometric forms in depiction of subjects. The term “Cubism” derived from a comment made by the French art critic Louis Vauxcelles. Louis Vauzcelles described Braque’s work Houses at L’Estaque which he had painted at L’Estaque in emulation of Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) in 1908 as being composed of “cubes”. Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque first met in 1905, but in 1907 Braque was first acquainted with Picasso’s groundbreaking Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso himself. Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (The Brothel of Avignon) is considered to be the first cubist painting and was heavily influenced by African tribal art that Picasso had first seen in May or June, 1907 at ethnographic museum in the Palais du Trocadéro in Paris. …

An Empty Place

Winter is a great time to listen to music. No annoying noise from fans and as the people are not out as much and traffic comes to a halt the world seems quieter. Those who live in the parts of world that experience snowfall know it even better. There’s a silence in snowfall and fog. It’s like they are getting in the way of sound. It’s actually they really do get in the way of sound but they affect the higher frequencies more than they affect the lower ones. And it somewhat creates a stillness. An eerie, muted and dumb stillness that you hear at nights, especially when you go to bed. Horror movies tend to use this similar technique in order to have a stifle background in them too. But this phenomenon alone is not enough to stifle all the sound in nature. The temperature has a lot to do with the stillness. Cold air is denser than the warm one and sound travels much slower through denser material than it does through lighter …

Beneath the Shrouds of Thoughts

By Bidisha Sinha // greatdipper.wordpress.com A gold digger chips on in a dark, dingy mine while his face gets plastered with mud… the silence of the night broken by the constant chipping… the music feels the room and into my veins of thoughts. As the cigarette smoke infiltrates my senses, my mind wanders in and out of the things that have happened with me and others. How the lives that is entwined with mine have been living on edges of reality and the unexplained… and yet we all live on with our lives.. isn’t it.. Borderline crazy??? I have submerged my god or ghost consciousness at the altar of science… yet today.. things go beyond my reasons. The only other time I felt this crazy was when I was in love .. but love and bewilderment and fear are different things— differing in their basic anatomy of impact. I was hoping I would never have to write about my dreams—that dreams are exaggerations of our thoughts— convoluted by the feelings that we can never perceive. …