All posts filed under: Highlights

Motherhood: Maman by Louise Bourgeois

Art, at its best, has been an expression of the human experience of life and the theme of mother and child has been a central motif in art for centuries. The Virgin Mary has presented the ideal of a protective mother to which women have aspired. But in the age of post-Freudian psychoanalysis, motherhood has become more eccentric and complex than ever. Louise Bourgeois was born on 25th December 1911 in Paris, France. She was the second child of three born to parents Joséphine Fauriaux and Louis Bourgeois. Taking up art was a way for her to fight specific fears. The fear and trauma of abandonment that she suffered not only through her untimely birth on Christmas Day but also on her mother’s death in 1932, when she was only twenty-one. Louise drew on painful memories of childhood traumas to create her tribute to her mother. In 1996, The Maman was created as a part of Bourgeois’s inaugural commission of The Unilever Series (2000), in the Turbine Hall at London’s Tate Modern. It’s a bronze, …

TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day: La Javanaise

La Javanaise was written and composed by Serge Gainsbourg originally for Juliette Gréco, and interpreted by both her and Serge Gainsbourg in 1963. The story behind the song goes: One summer evening in 1962, Gréco and Gainsbourg spent the evening listening to records and drinking champagne in the huge lounge at 33, rue de Verneuil. The next day, he sent her La Javanaise. The song has been used in many movies. From 1998s romantic comedy Dieu seul me voit (Only God Sees Me) to 2017s academy award wining romantic dark fantasy The Shape of Water and it has been as fascinating every single time. La Javanaise is TheLarchWood’s Song of the Day getting 5 conifer cones out of 5 for the day. Listen Below. visit LarchWood for more!

Nostalgia for a Time you never experienced

You might have heard the quote of L.P.Hartley from the novel The Go-Between: “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” There will always be something about the music that our grandparents and parents would listen to when we were children. They bring a keen sense of nostalgia for a time that we didn’t experience. The music of our grandparents’ and parents’ youth. When we are in our middle or late adulthood we seem to find a great pleasure in the music of our youth. Something that is called a reminiscence bump. A tendency for older adults to have increased recollection for events and memories that seemed to have occurred in their twenties ( adolescence and early adulthood). But what about the music of our grandparents’ and parents’ adolescence and early adulthood?  To the psychological scientist and lead researcher Carol Lynne Krumhansl of Cornell University, this phenomena is called cascading reminiscence bump. In an article published on psychologicalscience he put it “Music transmitted from generation to generation shapes autobiographical memories, preferences, and …

A Woman Ahead of Her Time: Susan Waters

When it comes to American Folk Art, one name pops up in mind first. The woman ahead of her time, a self-taught artist Susan Catherine Moore Waters or simply Susan Waters. Susan Catherine Moore Waters was born on May 18, 1823 in Binghamton, New York. The daughter of Sally Camp Moore (1788-a 1880) & Lark Moore (1790-1871). They moved near Friendsville, Pennsylvania, when Susan was a child & lived on a farm, which she painted as a landscape later. Susan was a self-taught artist with little formal training. She attended seminary school in Friendsville where she paid tuition of her sister and herself by painting copies for the course in Natural History. At 17, on June 27, 1841 she married William C. Waters whose Quaker connections determined the destinations of their frequent relocations. Susan portrayed a number of her early portraits in southern New York state. She became a successful excursive artist, a supporter of women’s rights and an animal rights activist. But William had a health problem and was unable to provide sufficient income …

The Tale of the Immortals

Daoism or Taoism is a tradition of Chinese origin emerged as a religious and philosophical system at about the same time as Confucianism , around the 6th–5th century BCE. It emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao or Dao (A Chinese word that signifies “the way” or “the path”. Tao is the natural order of the universe that underlies everything from the creation of galaxies to the interaction of human beings.) Later, with the growing popularity of Buddhism, Daoism acquired all the trappings of a religion. The “Eight Immortals” were the central figures of Daoist myth. They were a group of legendary xian (immortals) in Chinese mythology. Each of them were able to bestow life or destroy evil. These legendary beings have been part of Chinese oral history long before they were recorded in the works of writers of various dynasties – Tang, Song, Yuan and Ming. The Eight Immortals: Photo acquired by Henry Walters, 1915 They had all gained eternal life through seeking the Daoist way. Though they were not gods, their immortality gave them superhuman …

The Great Hidden Sea of Time

I look up. A flock of birds are hovering above. It’s pale and fumy and cold. The sun should be setting in an hour or two. There comes Mr. Eyvindarson, on his way back to home from work. If this would mean to be a story there would have been something about it. There would be a storm or a bad news or good. But it isn’t, it’s just me in my sickbed wondering what and how am I going to publish something and failing every time. Henceforth, Mr. Eyvindarson will be safe and sound and he’ll only live as long as someone is reading this blog. Time slows down by 10 times when we’re sick and bored and unable to pull off anything whatsoever. I think this is something most of my readers would agree upon. As we grow up time seems to move faster than it used to. Similarly when we are on a vacation or having a good time with our family and friends time seems to pass by in the blink …