All posts filed under: Movies

A Young Director and his only film

I came across a brief write up by one of my acquaintances on Facebook   a few days back. “…Asia is the place where cinema is still breathing a fresh whiff of significant cinema – something which current European cinema is visibly lacking!”, it concluded. He listed a bunch of directors from different parts of Asia who are shining with their works today. But what caught my eyes was this line: “Sadly, I couldn’t add Bo Hu’s name.” I asked him if it’s because of the fact Hu Bo is no more. His answer was ‘yes’. ‘An elephant sitting still” is the first and the last feature film by Chinese director Hu Bo. He killed himself during the final editing procedure of the film, in 2017, at the age of 29. The film came out in 2018 and immediately gained attention from world audience. Hu Bo was a student of Bela Tarr, the Hungarian auteur. The film opens up in a morning with a story about an elephant, narrated in a voice of one of the …

Maborosi and memory

Maborosi, the first feature film by contemporary Japanese maestro Kore-eda Hirokazu. Yumiko, the protagonist, is a girl when we first meet her. She lives with her parents and grandmother in Osaka. Her grandmother leaves the home to go back to the village she is from before dying. Yumiko tries to stop her but fails. Her grandmother never comes back. She met a boy with a bicycle named Iuko and the story cuts forward to several years when they are married and have a new-born child. Their life is happy and charming until Yumiko becomes a widow. After five years or so a well-wisher of Yumiko finds a match for her named Tamio who lives with his daughter and his father in a village by the sea far away from Osaka. Yumiko moves there with her son to start a new life. I sat still in my chair even after the end credits were gone and the faint hint of light was clearing out the darkness of the screen. I was in my room and it …

Le Mariage Collectif – A Soundtrack Worth Remembering

If you type in Le Mariage Collectif or simply Collective Marriage on Google, it’s definitely unlike most of the search results you would get for a movie. There’s not much out there on internet about it that might be of your interest. Mariage Collectif has been anything but remembered by history as an important movie, that’s for sure, a fact even admitted by the press release for its soundtrack. A 1971’s French drama based upon a married couple having difficulties in sexual relationship. Sounds lame, right? Well, not everything about this movie is as lame as you think it might be. Conversely, Mariage Collectif could be taken as a minor classic as well. But what has really been noteworthy and significant about it is the soundtrack from Jean-Pierre Mirouze and the story behind the recovery of the album. Even though, Mariage Collectif’s soundtrack is considered one of the most fascinating album out there and has influenced many sounds of 21st century, the album was once long forgotten and had been conserved through only a handful …

Of Swan Lake

Back when I was a kid, another fascinating thing about an animated series was the music. The weekends were full of joints from Justice League, Spider-Man: The New Animated Series, Gargoyles, Cédric, Oswald, Bob the Builder, Noddy, Looney Tunes and many others that I probably don’t even remember the name of. Back when there was not really a thing called internet to take over the control of your attention span. No annoying notifications from your IG or Twitter to ponder upon. So everything you would do, especially, aesthetically, you would do in absolute wonder. You know the Richard David James’ quote, “The holy grail for a music fan is to hear music from another planet, which has not been influenced by us whatsoever. Or, even better, from lots of different planets. The closest we got to that was before the Internet, when people didn’t know of each other’s existence. Now, that doesn’t really happen.” There was a minimal beauty in grasping an album by heart. The one album that you’d know every word of or …

The Anatomy of Ghost Movies

It goes like this: it’s about time you know very well you’re going to regret afterwards but you do it anyway. “The door creaks open, they always do. something comes up.” A smashing sound makes you almost fall off the couch or bed. Now you’re having trouble getting to the bathroom or closing your eyes because every time you try either one of them you imagine the ghost that you just laid your eyes upon. THE LORD BLESS THEE because you need it more than anything right now. And you have to wake up early for the school tomorrow. As you grow up it becomes quite conventional. The ghost comes, poses for the camera for a real long hour and eventually kill everyone in the family or house. Yeah something like that. The same song and dance. Nothing more or less. And if you want anything more than this you need a good ghost. The one who doesn’t kill people. AHHH, I don’t know if you really wanna watch them. So you become bored of …

Galveston

What would happen if a superhero movie had to deal with the uncompromising ethos of life? You would probably watch your favorite superhero being shot and killed from behind while dauntlessly fighting the other antagonists in the movie. It’s an indomitable bravery that would not necessarily have to be paid off. And there would be one simple answer to that: the evil has its fair share. That reminds me of movies where your favorite characters encounter the ferine denouement, where the evil isn’t necessarily punished in the end and most importantly, where audiences’ feels remain unjust… Are there many? I guess not. If movies were to deal with such harsh and keen reality then all hope towards equity and good would vanquish. But for those, who seek pessimism and realism to be the key element of art; Galveston is definitely the movie. Just a little slow, like a Monday noon in the sickbed that can’t be outrun.