All posts tagged: life

A Young Director and his only film

I came across a brief write up by one of my acquaintances on Facebook   a few days back. “…Asia is the place where cinema is still breathing a fresh whiff of significant cinema – something which current European cinema is visibly lacking!”, it concluded. He listed a bunch of directors from different parts of Asia who are shining with their works today. But what caught my eyes was this line: “Sadly, I couldn’t add Bo Hu’s name.” I asked him if it’s because of the fact Hu Bo is no more. His answer was ‘yes’. ‘An elephant sitting still” is the first and the last feature film by Chinese director Hu Bo. He killed himself during the final editing procedure of the film, in 2017, at the age of 29. The film came out in 2018 and immediately gained attention from world audience. Hu Bo was a student of Bela Tarr, the Hungarian auteur. The film opens up in a morning with a story about an elephant, narrated in a voice of one of the …

Listen to these Sounds of Mother Earth

On a recent trip to an ‘isolated mountain’, I happened to realize how insignificant we are in this vastness of space. Traveling at the speed of light, it would take almost 100,000 years to cross the Milky Way. So if you imagine a particle of dust upon this gargantuan planet, you are still nowhere near to perceive how infinitesimally small a position we occupy in this universe. Yet, here on Earth, not everyone of us are reinforced when we think about our place in this space. Some of us even dip ourselves in the faith that Earth is flat and everything else around us is revolved around this celestial being to cope with this implausible vastness. But in the grand scheme of things, the truth is, we are just too small. Reflecting on this vastness and our insignificance within this universe often leads to a philosophical question and that is: Should one feel dreary for being too small? Because this idea of banality gives an immense spur to nihilism, that’s for sure. For all we …

Motherhood: Maman by Louise Bourgeois

Art, at its best, has been an expression of the human experience of life and the theme of mother and child has been a central motif in art for centuries. The Virgin Mary has presented the ideal of a protective mother to which women have aspired. But in the age of post-Freudian psychoanalysis, motherhood has become more eccentric and complex than ever. Louise Bourgeois was born on 25th December 1911 in Paris, France. She was the second child of three born to parents Joséphine Fauriaux and Louis Bourgeois. Taking up art was a way for her to fight specific fears. The fear and trauma of abandonment that she suffered not only through her untimely birth on Christmas Day but also on her mother’s death in 1932, when she was only twenty-one. Louise drew on painful memories of childhood traumas to create her tribute to her mother. In 1996, The Maman was created as a part of Bourgeois’s inaugural commission of The Unilever Series (2000), in the Turbine Hall at London’s Tate Modern. It’s a bronze, …

Sunshine Blogger Award

Sorry this should have been posted on yesterday but I’m so into Holiday spirit right now. Thanks to henablogforpaws for the Sunshine Blogger Award nomination. It’s an honor. The Sunshine Blogger Award is an award for bloggers who inspire and spread positivity and joy. For me it means my hard work has been noticed. So thanks so much henablogforpaws. Check Hena’s amazing blogs here: https://henablogforpaws.wordpress.com/. Hena’s Blog For Paws is all about everything you need to know before having a furry friend in your family. Rules: 1. Thank the person who nominated you, and provide a link back to their blogging site. 2. Answer the questions. 3. Nominate 11 other bloggers; and ask them 11 new questions. 4. Notify the nominees about it by commenting on 1 of their blog posts. 5. List the rules, and display the Sunshine Bloggers Award logo on your site or on your post. Questions from Hena: 1. If not a blogger then you would have been? Ans. I actually do make music. 2. How to stop violence against women? Ans. Violence …

The Moonlight: John Atkinson Grimshaw

The “remarkable and imaginative painter” of Victorian Era who is best known for his somber moonlight upon urban landscapes and dockyards through leafless trees or cotton clouds expounded with pallid and augmented silhouettes, light and wet city streets. Born in Park Street, Leeds on 6 September 1836 to Mary and David Grimshaw, John Atkinson Grimshaw began his working life as a clerk for the Great Northern Railway. It was during the time as a clerk he begun to explore his love for painting. In 1861, at the age of 24, to the dismay of his parents, he abandoned his job to endorse all his time to become a painter. In 1862, only a year later after he had left his job, Grimshaw had his first exhibition under the patronage of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, which was mostly paintings of birds, fruit and blossom focused on still life and nature. By 1870, Grimashaw became successful enough to move to Knostrop Hall and rented another house in Scarborough, which he called ‘The Castle by the Sea’ …

False Memory

“A house made of hay and earth. There are small deities inside adorned with beads made of flower. They look old and pale and full of repudiations. A small ground out front that interconnects.. something..” Looking back at “it”, I don’t quite remember whether it is a dream or a memory. If it is a dream therefore I must have dreamed of it as a child and if it’s a memory, I’m quite certain it’s filled with glitches and false information. Most of us have the notion that our memory is solid and works in a way where we are only able to either remember things or forget things. Where as a matter of fact, our memory works in a quite intricate way. It can transform, change, reform and be unreliable at times. We can falsely remember a childhood event that never took place through effective suggestions. We can be tricked into changing a particular event that did took place or tricked into remembering events that never took place at all. While we might think …

Saudade: The Love That Remains

When it comes to the word Saudade, there are plenty of things that come in mind. The 1974’s Moacir Santos album, the 2011’s Japanese movie, the 1994’s song by Chris Rea, or the 2014’s Thievery Corporation album and many more. But what about this word or expression that led these artists, musicians, and director to make so many projects named after it? Being nostalgic for a time that you didn’t experience can be defined by cascading reminiscence bump, a phenomena when people not only resonate to the events from their own youth but the events from their grandparents and parents youth as well but as a form of musical memory. But Saudade is somewhat quite opposite of cascading reminiscence bump or reminiscence bump in general. It is the longing for a time that someone once experienced and loved fondly but know that they might never experience it again. It’s a repressed belief that the object of longing might never come back. Saudade is a word in Portuguese and Galician that is almost untranslatable in English. …

Female Artists of the Victorian Era: Evelyn De Morgan

Evelyn De Morgan (Mary Evelyn Pickering) was an English painter in the reign of Queen Victoria, Edward VII and George V who was within the circle of later phase of the Pre-Raphaelites who took their influences from the romantic paintings of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones. Evelyn was born in 1855 to a upper middle class family in London and was introduced to art by her uncle John Roddam Spencer Stanhope. On her 17th birthday, August 30th 1872, Evelyn recorded in her diary “At the beginning of each year I say ‘I will do something’ and at the end I have done nothing. Art is eternal, but life is short”..”I will make up for it now, I have not a moment to lose.” In 1873, she was enrolled at the Slade School of Art and her style of painting developed rapidly in those three years. It is believed that in the beginning of 1875 Evelyn often visited John Roddam Spencer Stanhope in Florence where he resided. It enabled her to study the …

The Great Hidden Sea of Time

I look up. A flock of birds are hovering above. It’s pale and fumy and cold. The sun should be setting in an hour or two. There comes Mr. Eyvindarson, on his way back to home from work. If this would mean to be a story there would have been something about it. There would be a storm or a bad news or good. But it isn’t, it’s just me in my sickbed wondering what and how am I going to publish something and failing every time. Henceforth, Mr. Eyvindarson will be safe and sound and he’ll only live as long as someone is reading this blog. Time slows down by 10 times when we’re sick and bored and unable to pull off anything whatsoever. I think this is something most of my readers would agree upon. As we grow up time seems to move faster than it used to. Similarly when we are on a vacation or having a good time with our family and friends time seems to pass by in the blink …

Painted Memories

The other day I was having a conversation about dreams and nightmares with some of my friends. I got to hear a lot of crazy stories and some of them were eerie experiences of sleeping paralysis. As some of you might know and agree it could be a worse experience of them all. Thankfully I didn’t ever have a perception that could be called sleeping paralysis in direct terms. However, I noticed that some of them believes that sleeping paralysis is a spiritual phenomenon and that, spirits truly come and take over the control of their body. I could not agree less. However, as the time went on those stories of dreams and nightmares changed into the experiences of familiarity. Meaning, events that seem like they have already happened in the past; also known as déjà vu. A common intuitive experience that happens or has happened to many of us. A couple of months ago I was on a trip to a beach. It’s a place I visit twice or thrice a year. And every time …

Anna, You’re Lost in a Shadow There

I have been watching a Netflix series lately, which some of you might know the name of or have watched in the meantime. Even though it has just been 2 episodes I think it’d be safe to admit that I’m finding it quite absorbing. It’s called Maniac based on the Norwegian television series of the same name by Espen PA Lervaag; starring Emma Stone, Jonah Hills, Gabriel Byrne, Sonoya Mizuno and many others. Based on these two episodes I think Maniac delineates a time frame that took place in the past, presumably the very late 90’s or early 00’s. But it alludes a lifestyle and technologies that is far better than what it was in those times. A future that never took place but everyone dreamed about in 70’s or 80’s. Even though it feels somewhat nostalgic to have all these influences on our entertainments and lifestyles, I kind of find it terrifying how as we are moving towards the future our perceptions and perspectives are changing along with it. We no longer visualize an …

Someday the Waves

Looked through my window and it’s almost dark out. It’s only 4:48 in the afternoon or might I say evening. I had a lazy day today. It was almost to the point where i thought I’d not write and was going to give up on daily blogging. One half of me had had every excuse to give up as well. I thought I am going to post something really amazing tomorrow. Something informative and interesting and would take an ample amount of research in order to formulate; so it’d be precise to skip a day and do some research on the topic. while the other half of me didn’t want to break the chain of daily blogging at all. I supposed it’d be unnecessary and improper. Especially when I didn’t have a proper reason to not write. It was an incessant conflict of self. And it transformed my sheer idleness to restlessness. So I decided to give it a try. Because sitting there and dwelling upon whether or not to write or post was not getting me …

A Festival of Light

Diwali is one of the most beautiful days in India filled with light, good wishes and joy. A festival that symbolizes the spiritual victory of light over darkness, good over evil and knowledge over ignorance. There was a time when my brother and I would make lists of firework for these days and for our parents to buy for us. The elation would go on for days. Sometimes we’d collect dry leaves, especially leaf from banana trees and set them up on fire in the evening. It was kind of a warm up game for us before we’d start playing with the firecrackers. Though there is a different myth behind this ritual of setting the leaves on fire. it’s called Narapora or Burir ghor porano ( To burn an old entity’s house) and is performed to welcome the spirit of freshness, to burn all the evils inside us and that wander around. However, I had a different experience of Diwali last night. The neighborhood went absolutely dark after an electricity blackout for more than two …

Beneath the Shrouds of Thoughts

By Bidisha Sinha // greatdipper.wordpress.com A gold digger chips on in a dark, dingy mine while his face gets plastered with mud… the silence of the night broken by the constant chipping… the music feels the room and into my veins of thoughts. As the cigarette smoke infiltrates my senses, my mind wanders in and out of the things that have happened with me and others. How the lives that is entwined with mine have been living on edges of reality and the unexplained… and yet we all live on with our lives.. isn’t it.. Borderline crazy??? I have submerged my god or ghost consciousness at the altar of science… yet today.. things go beyond my reasons. The only other time I felt this crazy was when I was in love .. but love and bewilderment and fear are different things— differing in their basic anatomy of impact. I was hoping I would never have to write about my dreams—that dreams are exaggerations of our thoughts— convoluted by the feelings that we can never perceive. …

Halloween Inscriptions: Part – I চোদ্দোশাক, চোদ্দোবাতি

A foggy October’s evening..Two phantoms settle and talk in a bamboo-bush across a pond. Today is the day of warding off the evil spirit after all. The natives call it Bhoot Chaturdashi. They eat 14 kinds of leafy greens and light up 14 candles for the custom. Long ago, on these days, people would leave edibles in this bush. But now, they don’t reckon with such rituals anymore. No one cares either, else, in what sort of seriousness would a 10 years old shout “ayy, who’s sitting there…?” …..on a day like this! Lately, several foreign news have been surfacing…..They carve pumpkins to make ghost faces…Kids go door to door while dressing up like a ghost….It’s something, they call… Halloween. Whatever, those mores have never been in vogue here…Ones that remained are dwindling into the light in Banerjees’ new house’s yard. The phantoms become somewhat sad and start walking towards a ground.. The dairyman’s wife paces  towards home. She scrutinizes her surroundings repeatedly and cautiously. The day is Bhoot Chaturdashi after all; the phantoms are out there; wandering. Banerjees’ …

“ফার্স্ট পার্সন”: HOLOCENE DAYS PT. 1

We didn’t have a second floor yet. Our house was almost surrounded by trees, some were really big wood apple or bael and mango trees and the small ones kind of formed bushes and shrubs. The bushes had concluded into a mound and the mound into a field to the east. It was where my friends and i would play every afternoon. Our house used to have a steeper stoop to the front porch and it was all red in color with enough space to congregate and chat. This activity was a staple back in the days for those sitting as well as those passing by especially on warm summer nights and weekends. The porch was engirdled by half wall and half grille. My granddad would sit in an armchair on there or on the stoop almost all day and would have a little chat with neighborhood folks. Some of them would even drop by to have a longer conversation and cup of tea. My granddad had a very specific routine of things that he would …