All posts tagged: writing

A Young Director and his only film

I came across a brief write up by one of my acquaintances on Facebook   a few days back. “…Asia is the place where cinema is still breathing a fresh whiff of significant cinema – something which current European cinema is visibly lacking!”, it concluded. He listed a bunch of directors from different parts of Asia who are shining with their works today. But what caught my eyes was this line: “Sadly, I couldn’t add Bo Hu’s name.” I asked him if it’s because of the fact Hu Bo is no more. His answer was ‘yes’. ‘An elephant sitting still” is the first and the last feature film by Chinese director Hu Bo. He killed himself during the final editing procedure of the film, in 2017, at the age of 29. The film came out in 2018 and immediately gained attention from world audience. Hu Bo was a student of Bela Tarr, the Hungarian auteur. The film opens up in a morning with a story about an elephant, narrated in a voice of one of the …

Maborosi and memory

Maborosi, the first feature film by contemporary Japanese maestro Kore-eda Hirokazu. Yumiko, the protagonist, is a girl when we first meet her. She lives with her parents and grandmother in Osaka. Her grandmother leaves the home to go back to the village she is from before dying. Yumiko tries to stop her but fails. Her grandmother never comes back. She met a boy with a bicycle named Iuko and the story cuts forward to several years when they are married and have a new-born child. Their life is happy and charming until Yumiko becomes a widow. After five years or so a well-wisher of Yumiko finds a match for her named Tamio who lives with his daughter and his father in a village by the sea far away from Osaka. Yumiko moves there with her son to start a new life. I sat still in my chair even after the end credits were gone and the faint hint of light was clearing out the darkness of the screen. I was in my room and it …

From Revenge to a Reconciliation Factory

When you’re an adult, one of the many things you miss the most is probably the ingenuousness of your childhood and the simplicity it once bestowed upon your forsaken infancy. Gone are the simple and colorful splashes of a livelihood that once made you happy. But you’ve always gotta move forward; well, that’s the only option!! And with coming-to-age technologies and social media it’s getting even harder everyday to keep up with the simplicity that you once experienced. We just can’t seem to hold on to and get enough of them. And it’s not just about an intricate lifestyle but everything aesthetic we are revolved around with. From a piece of art to a fragment of music, we tend to seek the steepest ravine to appreciate the art and the artist. Walking into the auditorium on Anya Theater’s Revenge Factory, directed by Debashish, there’s an instant feeling of proximity conveyed upon the audiences as soon as the curtain unravels. A utility pole entangled with wires with an almost fuzzy yellow light hanging from it. Just …

Le Mariage Collectif – A Soundtrack Worth Remembering

If you type in Le Mariage Collectif or simply Collective Marriage on Google, it’s definitely unlike most of the search results you would get for a movie. There’s not much out there on internet about it that might be of your interest. Mariage Collectif has been anything but remembered by history as an important movie, that’s for sure, a fact even admitted by the press release for its soundtrack. A 1971’s French drama based upon a married couple having difficulties in sexual relationship. Sounds lame, right? Well, not everything about this movie is as lame as you think it might be. Conversely, Mariage Collectif could be taken as a minor classic as well. But what has really been noteworthy and significant about it is the soundtrack from Jean-Pierre Mirouze and the story behind the recovery of the album. Even though, Mariage Collectif’s soundtrack is considered one of the most fascinating album out there and has influenced many sounds of 21st century, the album was once long forgotten and had been conserved through only a handful …

Of Swan Lake

Back when I was a kid, another fascinating thing about an animated series was the music. The weekends were full of joints from Justice League, Spider-Man: The New Animated Series, Gargoyles, Cédric, Oswald, Bob the Builder, Noddy, Looney Tunes and many others that I probably don’t even remember the name of. Back when there was not really a thing called internet to take over the control of your attention span. No annoying notifications from your IG or Twitter to ponder upon. So everything you would do, especially, aesthetically, you would do in absolute wonder. You know the Richard David James’ quote, “The holy grail for a music fan is to hear music from another planet, which has not been influenced by us whatsoever. Or, even better, from lots of different planets. The closest we got to that was before the Internet, when people didn’t know of each other’s existence. Now, that doesn’t really happen.” There was a minimal beauty in grasping an album by heart. The one album that you’d know every word of or …

A Brief History of SELF-TAUGHT & OUTSIDER ART

Outsider art had its origins in the psychiatric collections of 19th-century European psychiatric hospitals when some psychiatrists started to collect artworks produced by their patients. But it was originally recognized as a specific category of artistic production in the 20th century. Interest in the art of the mentally ill, along with the children, was first demonstrated by the members of Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group: Auguste Macke, Franz Marc, Wassily Kandinsky and others. But after the death of Macke and Marc during World War I, Paul Klee continued to draw inspiration from the primitives. Klee’s interest in outsider productions can be traced to 1912, when, in a review of a Der blaue Reiter (The blue rider) exhibition, he urged the public to take the art of children and the mad seriously. In 1921, Doctor and psychiatrist Walter Morgenthaler published his book Ein Geisteskranker als Künstler (A Psychiatric Patient as Artist/Madness and Art) about Adolf Wölfli, one of his patients and one of the first artists to be associated with the Art Brut or …

Motherhood: Maman by Louise Bourgeois

Art, at its best, has been an expression of the human experience of life and the theme of mother and child has been a central motif in art for centuries. The Virgin Mary has presented the ideal of a protective mother to which women have aspired. But in the age of post-Freudian psychoanalysis, motherhood has become more eccentric and complex than ever. Louise Bourgeois was born on 25th December 1911 in Paris, France. She was the second child of three born to parents Joséphine Fauriaux and Louis Bourgeois. Taking up art was a way for her to fight specific fears. The fear and trauma of abandonment that she suffered not only through her untimely birth on Christmas Day but also on her mother’s death in 1932, when she was only twenty-one. Louise drew on painful memories of childhood traumas to create her tribute to her mother. In 1996, The Maman was created as a part of Bourgeois’s inaugural commission of The Unilever Series (2000), in the Turbine Hall at London’s Tate Modern. It’s a bronze, …

The Readymade that Influenced the Nihilistic Dada, the Pop and Conceptual Art

The theory behind the “Readymade” was explained in an anonymous editorial published in the May 1917 issue of avant-garde magazine The Blind Man. An art and Dada journal organized briefly by Henri-Pierre Roché, Marcel Duchamp and Beatrice Wood in New York City. It read: “Whether Mr Mutt with his own hands made the fountain or not has no importance. He CHOSE it. He took an ordinary article of life, and placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view – created a new thought for that object.” In April, 1917, Marcel Duchamp made his most notorious Readymade, Fountain, a porcelain urinal signed “R.Mutt”. The work is regarded by art historians and theorists of the avant-garde as a major landmark in 20th-century art. Accompanied by artist Joseph Stella and art collector Walter Arensberg, Duchamp purchased a standard Bedfordshire model urinal from the J. L. Mott Iron Works, 118 Fifth Avenue. The artist brought the urinal to his studio at 33 West 67th Street, reoriented it 90 degrees from its …

An Insistence of Change: The Energy And Intent Behind the Outset of Italian Futurism

When Étienne-Jules Marey developed a way of recording several phases of movement in one photograph in 1882, it became one of the key ideas behind the onset of Futurism in the early 20th century. Focusing on progress and modernity, the Futurists sought to sweep away traditional artistic notions and replace them with an energetic celebration of the machine age. They emphasized on creating a unique and dynamic vision of the future with speed, technology, youth, violence, and objects such as the car, the airplane, and the industrial city. The birth of Futurism was declared with an incendiary manifesto appeared in La gazzetta dell’Emilia on 5th February, 1909 by the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti. The article was then republished in the French daily newspaper Le Figaro on Saturday 20 February 1909. According to the manifesto, Italy was to be delivered from its smelly gangrene of professors, archeologists, ciceroni and antiquarians and the Futurists would “sing the love of danger, the habit of energy and fearlessness”. Marinetti expressed a passionate loathing for everything old, especially political …

The Legacy of Cubism

The most radical movement in avant-garde art in Europe, the beginning of Cubism dated back to 1907 when Picasso completed his groundbreaking Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon, originally titled The Brothel of Avignon), a crowded canvas that portrays five nude female prostitutes in a brothel on Carrer d’Avinyó (Avignon Street) in Barcelona. Cubist painters portrayed the world as it was known, rather than as it was seen, challenging the idea of revolutionaries like Giotto and Brunelleschi who used one-point perspective to idealistically project and imitate the seen world onto canvas. Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque worked together in the beginning of 20th century to challenge this idea which had dominated the Western art since the Renaissance. The early phase of Cubism, which is often refereed to as Analytic Cubism, lasted until 1912. It entailed detailed analysis and dissection of objects and the space they occupied. As the poet and critic Guillaume Appollinaire observed, “Picasso studies an object the way a surgeon dissects a corpse”. Between 1913 and 1920 the development of Analytic …

The Incoherent Relationship Between Mental Health And Spring

Welcome to the happiness farm. It is Spring after all. You have probably heard the quote from Rainer Maria Rilke: “It is spring again. The earth is like a child that knows poems by heart.” But unfortunately the past 25 years or so have been different and the rates of depression and anxiety amongst people, especially the young adults, have risen by 70%. Almost 1 in 4 people between 16 to 25 have had suicidal thoughts and the number of children and young people with mental health issue has more than doubled since 2009. In the past 6 years, hospital admissions for teenagers with eating disorders have also almost doubled as well and even with this, according to the World Health Organization “Stigma and discrimination against patients and families prevent people from seeking mental health care”. Last year, on April 20th, Tim Bergling (better known as AVICII), the renowned Electronic Music producer and DJ was found dead in a farm house near Muscat, Oman, at the age of 28. On 1st May, TMZ reported that …

The Anatomy of Ghost Movies

It goes like this: it’s about time you know very well you’re going to regret afterwards but you do it anyway. “The door creaks open, they always do. something comes up.” A smashing sound makes you almost fall off the couch or bed. Now you’re having trouble getting to the bathroom or closing your eyes because every time you try either one of them you imagine the ghost that you just laid your eyes upon. THE LORD BLESS THEE because you need it more than anything right now. And you have to wake up early for the school tomorrow. As you grow up it becomes quite conventional. The ghost comes, poses for the camera for a real long hour and eventually kill everyone in the family or house. Yeah something like that. The same song and dance. Nothing more or less. And if you want anything more than this you need a good ghost. The one who doesn’t kill people. AHHH, I don’t know if you really wanna watch them. So you become bored of …

Rainbow Road

The hardest part of resumption is that you probably wouldn’t know where to begin! And if you would, you wouldn’t know how. But there’s always a way. I haven’t posted in days. In 42 days to be precise. And I couldn’t possibly allow myself to pop up out of nowhere and just post an article on “A Brief History of Impressionism or something”. It’s something I love to do, that’s a sure thing. To write articles about different artistic movements, myths, music and many more (literally anything that comes in mind). But I somewhere felt the urge to write about the absence or break I had been on before I got into my regular blogging schedule. Back in the days when I was just a rug rat my parents would buy me drawing books! There would be apples and bananas. God, there were always apples and bananas in drawing books. But most importantly there would be drawings of suburbs and villages. Drawings that I was fond of. They were like pieces of music, I guess, …

Sunshine Blogger Award

Sorry this should have been posted on yesterday but I’m so into Holiday spirit right now. Thanks to henablogforpaws for the Sunshine Blogger Award nomination. It’s an honor. The Sunshine Blogger Award is an award for bloggers who inspire and spread positivity and joy. For me it means my hard work has been noticed. So thanks so much henablogforpaws. Check Hena’s amazing blogs here: https://henablogforpaws.wordpress.com/. Hena’s Blog For Paws is all about everything you need to know before having a furry friend in your family. Rules: 1. Thank the person who nominated you, and provide a link back to their blogging site. 2. Answer the questions. 3. Nominate 11 other bloggers; and ask them 11 new questions. 4. Notify the nominees about it by commenting on 1 of their blog posts. 5. List the rules, and display the Sunshine Bloggers Award logo on your site or on your post. Questions from Hena: 1. If not a blogger then you would have been? Ans. I actually do make music. 2. How to stop violence against women? Ans. Violence …

The Georgian Christmas

A brief idea of Christmas in Georgian period (1714 – 1830) can be found in the novels of Jane Austin. In Pride and Prejudice Lizzie writes, “Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world that he can spare from me. You are all to come to Pemberley at Christmas.” or Caroline Bingley writes to Jane, “I sincerely hope your Christmas in Hertfordshire may abound in the gaieties which that season generally brings”. In Sense And Sensibility Sir John describes John Willoughby by saying “last Christmas at a little hop at the park, he danced from eight o’clock till four, without once sitting down.” In Mansfield Park there’s a holiday ball held at Christmas which Sir Thomas gives for Fanny and William. In Emma, Emma looks forward to Christmas because her sister’s family will visit for a week. In Persuasion, Austen paints a charming Christmas scene; “On one side was a table occupied by some chattering girls, cutting up silk and gold paper; and on the other were tressels and trays, bending under the …

The Moonlight: John Atkinson Grimshaw

The “remarkable and imaginative painter” of Victorian Era who is best known for his somber moonlight upon urban landscapes and dockyards through leafless trees or cotton clouds expounded with pallid and augmented silhouettes, light and wet city streets. Born in Park Street, Leeds on 6 September 1836 to Mary and David Grimshaw, John Atkinson Grimshaw began his working life as a clerk for the Great Northern Railway. It was during the time as a clerk he begun to explore his love for painting. In 1861, at the age of 24, to the dismay of his parents, he abandoned his job to endorse all his time to become a painter. In 1862, only a year later after he had left his job, Grimshaw had his first exhibition under the patronage of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, which was mostly paintings of birds, fruit and blossom focused on still life and nature. By 1870, Grimashaw became successful enough to move to Knostrop Hall and rented another house in Scarborough, which he called ‘The Castle by the Sea’ …

Galveston

What would happen if a superhero movie had to deal with the uncompromising ethos of life? You would probably watch your favorite superhero being shot and killed from behind while dauntlessly fighting the other antagonists in the movie. It’s an indomitable bravery that would not necessarily have to be paid off. And there would be one simple answer to that: the evil has its fair share. That reminds me of movies where your favorite characters encounter the ferine denouement, where the evil isn’t necessarily punished in the end and most importantly, where audiences’ feels remain unjust… Are there many? I guess not. If movies were to deal with such harsh and keen reality then all hope towards equity and good would vanquish. But for those, who seek pessimism and realism to be the key element of art; Galveston is definitely the movie. Just a little slow, like a Monday noon in the sickbed that can’t be outrun.

A Brief History of Christmas Markets

It’s the time of the year in all across the Northern Europe, especially in Germany. The loveliness of choir singers engulfing the night with Christmas carols, the sound of children laughter and the good old aroma of thuringian sausages, gingerbread, gebrannte mandeln and many more. It’s the Christmas Market, also known as Christkindlmarkt, Christkindlesmarkt, Christkindlmarket, Christkindlimarkt, and Weihnachtsmarkt, indicating the beginning of Advent. For centuries, Christmas Markets have been a part of many people’s lives from all across the Northern Europe and brought a touch of happiness, joy, light and color to the winter nights. But where did it all start? The forerunner of Christmas Market went back to Vienna’s December Market in the middle ages in 1298 where the citizens were granted permission by Duke Albrecht I to hold a market for 14 days. Even though it was not associated with Christmas, it is believed to be the first market during Advent to impel the idea of Christmas Market in later years. However, Germany holds the first evidence of markets that were associated more …

A Brief History of Christmas Lights

On his way back to home from a sermon on one winter evening, the 16th century German professor of theology and the seminal figure in protestant reformer, Martin Luther was awed by the elegance of stars shining amidst the evergreen trees. Fascinated by the spectacle he erected a tree in his own house and adorned it with lighted candles. It is believed that Martin Luther was the first person who added candles to an evergreen. However, the ritual of using the evergreens during winter festivals predates Christianity. Pagans used evergreen fir branches to illustrate life in the dead of winter as it would make them think of the spring to come. However, the tradition of illuminating the Christmas tree with candles approximately began in late 17th century by Germans. Even though Martin Luther had lit the first tree a century earlier, the first documented reference of lighting the Christmas tree dated in 17th century. In 18th century, the upper class homes in German would decorate their trees with candles which at that time was a …

False Memory

“A house made of hay and earth. There are small deities inside adorned with beads made of flower. They look old and pale and full of repudiations. A small ground out front that interconnects.. something..” Looking back at “it”, I don’t quite remember whether it is a dream or a memory. If it is a dream therefore I must have dreamed of it as a child and if it’s a memory, I’m quite certain it’s filled with glitches and false information. Most of us have the notion that our memory is solid and works in a way where we are only able to either remember things or forget things. Where as a matter of fact, our memory works in a quite intricate way. It can transform, change, reform and be unreliable at times. We can falsely remember a childhood event that never took place through effective suggestions. We can be tricked into changing a particular event that did took place or tricked into remembering events that never took place at all. While we might think …

Saudade: The Love That Remains

When it comes to the word Saudade, there are plenty of things that come in mind. The 1974’s Moacir Santos album, the 2011’s Japanese movie, the 1994’s song by Chris Rea, or the 2014’s Thievery Corporation album and many more. But what about this word or expression that led these artists, musicians, and director to make so many projects named after it? Being nostalgic for a time that you didn’t experience can be defined by cascading reminiscence bump, a phenomena when people not only resonate to the events from their own youth but the events from their grandparents and parents youth as well but as a form of musical memory. But Saudade is somewhat quite opposite of cascading reminiscence bump or reminiscence bump in general. It is the longing for a time that someone once experienced and loved fondly but know that they might never experience it again. It’s a repressed belief that the object of longing might never come back. Saudade is a word in Portuguese and Galician that is almost untranslatable in English. …

Nostalgia for a Time you never experienced

You might have heard the quote of L.P.Hartley from the novel The Go-Between: “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” There will always be something about the music that our grandparents and parents would listen to when we were children. They bring a keen sense of nostalgia for a time that we didn’t experience. The music of our grandparents’ and parents’ youth. When we are in our middle or late adulthood we seem to find a great pleasure in the music of our youth. Something that is called a reminiscence bump. A tendency for older adults to have increased recollection for events and memories that seemed to have occurred in their twenties ( adolescence and early adulthood). But what about the music of our grandparents’ and parents’ adolescence and early adulthood?  To the psychological scientist and lead researcher Carol Lynne Krumhansl of Cornell University, this phenomena is called cascading reminiscence bump. In an article published on psychologicalscience he put it “Music transmitted from generation to generation shapes autobiographical memories, preferences, and …